Baird's tapir on the Tapir Gallery Web Site - click to learn more about Baird's tapirs
Baird's tapir
Mountain tapir on the Tapir Gallery Web Site - click to learn more about mountain tapirs
Mountain tapir
Asian tapir on the Tapir Gallery Web Site - click to learn more about Asian (or Malayan) tapirs
Asian tapir
Lowland tapir on the Tapir Gallery Web Site - click to learn more about lowland (or Brazilian) tapirs
Lowland tapir

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Tapir Gallery Home > About Tapirs

About Tapirs


What are tapirs and why are they interesting?


General Information

ESPECIALLY FOR STUDENTS: information and links
Links to information that will be most useful for your reports and papers.

Tapirs Described
This page has basic information on all four species, along with pictures and text that show the differences.

What has 14 hooves, a rubbery snout and walks under water?
This is a list of interesting facts.

Tapirs in Pictures
We think you'll enjoy exploring the picture pages. Not only will you get to enjoy the tapirs' pictures, but also we've accompanied the pictures with some fascinating information. This info will be easier to understand and absorb when illustrated by the pictures.

Lowland Tapir Sounds from the Hagenbeck Zoo
This clip comes from the zoo's page of animal sounds (click on "Tierstimmen: Flachland-Tapir"). Dr. Gerhard Prenner, Institute of Botany, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Austria, found this page "after intensive searching" on the Intenet. Many of you have asked us for tapir sounds, and we had none available. Thanks to Dr. Prenner in Austria and the Hagenbeck Zoo in Germany, here they are! Tapirs make many sounds. Most are birdlike chirps and squeals. All species sound basically similar, but some have noted that the mountain tapir seems to make higher pitched chirps under normal circumstances.

Tapirs in Zoos and Parks
Zoos promote tapir conservation, science, and education.

True Stories about Tapirs

Tapir Sightings

FAQ
These are some interesting questions people have asked.

Focus on the Baird's tapir
Here is a list of links to explore this species further.
And and here is a map of where they live.

Focus on the Brazilian (lowland) tapir
Here is a list of links to explore this species further.
And here is a map of where they live.

Focus on the mountain tapir
Here is a list of links to explore this species further.
And here is a map of where they live.

Focus on the Asian tapir
Here is a list of links to explore this species further.
And here is a map of where they live.

Other tapirs on the Web
Links to other peoples' tapir pages and tapir web sites, as well as links to interesting or entertaining odd bits about tapirs.

Publications and Media


Conservation and Science

How Can I Help?
Fundraising, volunteering, ecucation, etc.

Publications and Media

Project Profiles
This page is devoted to the people who are working to learn about and save tapirs. Some of these tapir projects are about science and some are about conservation. But we have to learn the science of tapirs before we can design effective conservation plans.

IUCN/SSC Tapir Specialist Group web site
See Action Plans, and newsletters, habitat condition, threats, natural history of the tapir, suggested conservation measures, new stories, and more.

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Search for the word tapir. This list has been updated, correcting a number of mistakes from past years and adding quite a few common names for the four tapir species.

IUCN/SSC: Species Newsletter
Another good source for tapir information is Species the newsletter of the IUCN Species Survival Commission. A number of issues are online (follow the link above and click on the links to each issue. Issues are posted in PDF format and are searchable. Most, if not all, of the issues posted include updates on tapirs.

Red Danta Colombia
In Spanish: Red Danta Colombia is an informal group of people that uses internet to communicate about its work with tapirs in Colombia. "Red Danta" means "tapir network." This is an exciting development in tapir conservation, and is still in its infancy.

Tapir Medicine

DigiMorph
This is the place to go for tapir evolution! Dr. Matthew Colbert, tapir paleontologist, presents unique views and information on tapirs using digital scans. The site also shows foot and trunk construction, teeth, and phylogenetic history. This is cutting-edge scientific information on some of the lesser known characteristics of these under-studied animals. You will also find range maps and a concise general overview of tapirs.

Gray Fossil Site
The Gray Fossil Site is the largest tapir fossil deposit ever found. Note that their logo is a tapir and calf!

Gray Fossil Site
By Martin Kohl, who discovered the first fossil bone at what is now known as the Gray Fossil Site in Tennessee. It has now been identified as the largest deposit of fossil tapir material yet discovered. The age, at first thought to be Pleistocene, has been determined most likely to be Miocene. Check out the photos of tapir material on this site. A history of the fossil bed is also given. Be sure to check out the links. You can also become a member of Friends of the Gray Fossil Site.

Fossil Tapirs in Florida
Check out this web site for a guide to fossil tapirs in Florida. If you've ever wondered about their surprising appearance (and extinction) this attractive site ("Endangered Wildlife") is a great place to begin your journey. Donna, thanks for highlighting a remarkable group of animals (tapirs!) that so many are just beginning to recognize! Tapirs in Florida? Read the surprising facts!

Comparative Placentation
Tapir is in the list under "Perissodactyla."

Tapirs in Museums
We've linked to collection databases.

Family Tree
Here you'll find where tapirs fit in the tree of life.



Purchasing a gift from
Tapir and Friends Wildlife Gift Shop
helps preserve living tapirs
and their habitats.


All tapirs are endangered species.
Saving tapirs helps save the rainforest.




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Write to us: tapir@tapirback.com